uwuq9m - rw70cp - qhl27n - e538xa - eigoys - 49j712 - 4300zg - s0s403
  • Teresa Manara and Giovanni Battista Cantele were married 82 years ago today

    On this day, 82 years ago, Teresa Manara and Giovanni Battista Cantele were wed.

    “Who knows,” wrote Gianni Cantele on his Facebook, “if on August 22, 82 years ago, they would have thought that their love story, which began in Imola [in northern Italy], would have led to their falling in love with Salento? They had great courage. And I will forever be thankful to them.”

    Click here to read the story of how Teresa and Giovanni Battista found their way to Salento and laid the foundation for what would become the Cantele winery.

  • The Cantele family “mosaic”…

    “Each of us is a tile in a mosaic that has taken shape over generations.”

    Umberto Cantele

    Last week, the Cantele family presented “Twenty Years of Cantele Teresa Manara Chardonnay,” a celebration of the wine named after the cousins’ grandmother Teresa — the woman who inspired it all.

    That’s the current generation of the Cantele family above, from left: Umberto, Luisa, Giani, Paolo, and Domenico.

    Thank you to everyone who has made this journey possible!

  • Cantele history: A black and white story with a Technicolor ending

    The Cantele story begins in black-and-white, like a Neorealist film. WWII was at its peak and Italians listened in secret to American radio. They couldn’t make out the song lyrics but they could understand the words love and hope.

    When the fighting was done, Giovanni Cantele set out from his home in war-torn northeastern Italy in search of a better life. He landed in the city of Imola (in the region of Romagna, north-central Italy) where he found steady work in the wine trade and where he would meet the love of his life, Teresa Manara.
    Continue reading Cantele history: A black and white story with a Technicolor ending

  • Cantele launches new partnership with Winebow

    I couldn’t be happy to share the following news with you.

    The Cantele winery — a third-generation, family-owned and operated estate in Puglia — is beginning a new partnership with the premier importer of fine Italian wines in the U.S., Winebow.

    Since its founding in 1979 by my grandfather Giovanni Battista, Cantele’s award-winning and highly rated wines have been a benchmark in Italian and Pugliese winemaking for 40 years. Our brand is one of Italy’s most esteemed and beloved and we sell our wines throughout the world, including northern Europe, Asia, and the Americas.

    Founded in 1980, Winebow has reshaped the Italian wine market in the U.S. by introducing some of Italy’s most iconic wineries to American restaurateurs, retailers, and consumers. Today, its distribution network is considered the gold standard among Italian wine trade members and observers.

    We couldn’t be more thrilled about this new adventure. There’s no doubt in our minds that Winebow has the prestige, the national reach, and the sales team that we need to continue to build our brand in north America.

    —Paolo Cantele

    About our family’s winery:

    The Cantele estate is a third-generation family-owned and run winery founded by the current generation’s grandparents, immigrants from the north who settled in Puglia’s Salento peninsula after WWII. Known for its pioneering work with Chardonnay and its passion for native grapes Negroamaro and Primitivo, Cantele delivers high-quality, value-driven wines.

    Salento is renowned for high-quality wine thanks to abundant ventilation, temperate weather, extreme diurnal shifts in summer, and limestone-rich soils. Over the last two decades, Cantele has implemented a cutting-edge “minimal intervention” system in its vineyards, thus ensuring freshness and varietal expression.

  • Augusto Cantele, Pugliese wine pioneer

    The story of Cantele founder Giovanni Battista Cantele’s “reverse” post-war immigration has been told many times.

    In an era when most southern Italians were heading north to find work in the factories of Milan and Turin, Giovanni Battista headed from Imola in Romagna to Lecce in Puglia. He had traveled there many times to broker the sale of grapes to be sent to the north. And while many of his contemporaries continued to operate in the north, traveling south as necessary, Giovanni Battista set up shop in Lecce where he worked directly with growers whose grapes were used to obtain darker color and higher alcohol levels in the cooler climate of the north, where — in a time before climate change — winemakers struggled to quench the thirst of Italy’s emerging middle class.
    Continue reading Augusto Cantele, Pugliese wine pioneer