• Rohesia isn’t just Negroamaro Rosato anymore.

    Every rose is unique. And every rose conveys a different message, every time. And that message is an expression of the elegance that makes an entire species of flower unique. The message is just about color. It’s a message about a particular type of talent. A sort of vocation, just like that of sunlight which shifts its tonality depending on the time of day. And this is how a polychromy of passions comes into being. These passions are what inspired our new line of wines, Rohesia. A triptych. Red. White. Rosé. No longer just Negroamaro Rosato but now also Malvasia Bianca and Susumaniello. With the launch of these wines, our Rohesia brand is in the spotlight. Its potential is greater than ever and its symbolic roots have now fanned out into three different declinations.

    Continue reading Rohesia isn’t just Negroamaro Rosato anymore.

  • For your holiday consideration: Cantele Rosato

    One of our most popular wines in the U.S., the Cantele Rosato is made from 100 percent Negroamaro grapes. The fruit is sourced from our top vineyards: The same grapes that are used to make our top Negroamaro also go into this beautiful pink wine.

    With just enough tannic structure to make it perfect for the holiday feast, its freshness and bright flavors make it a wine that everyone at the Thanksgiving table will enjoy.

    Having trouble finding it in your market? Please don’t hesitate to reach out to our American blogmaster here. He’ll be happy to help you source it in your city.

    Happy Thanksgiving to all of our friends in the U.S. Wishing you and family a happy and healthy holiday season!

  • A new Thanksgiving tradition: Teresa Manara Negroamaro

    It’s been an exciting year for Cantele in the U.S.

    Earlier this year, the winery launched its new partnership with Leonardo LoCascio Selections (Winebow), the number-one importer of Italian wines in the U.S. today.

    And for the first time since Cantele began selling its wines in the U.S. decades ago, the winery’s flagship Negroamaro — the Teresa Manara Negroamaro — is now widely available in the country.

    Like the estate’s flagship Chardonnay (Teresa Manara Chardonnay), it’s named after Teresa Manara Cantele, the woman who inspired the family to move to Puglia’s Salento peninsula three generations ago.

    It’s made with the estate’s top selection of Negroamaro grapes, picked at ideal ripeness to produce a full-bodied, rich but lithe expression of Salento’s noble red grape variety.

    We are particularly happy that it has finally made its way to the U.S. because we believe it’s a wonderful wine for the classic Thanksgiving meal, fresh on the nose and palate but with enough structure and smooth tannins to make pair well with Americans’ favorite holiday dishes.

    Feel free to email our American blogmaster Jeremy if you need help finding Teresa Manara Negroamaro at a wine shop near you.

    Happy Thanksgiving to all of our American friends!

  • Harvest 2019 comes to an end…

    Those are some of the very last Negroamaro grapes that winemaker Gianni Cantele and his team harvested last week.

    The bunches will be used to make Cantele’s top red wine, the Teresa Manara Negroamaro.

    A native grape variety of Puglia (the heel of Italy’s boot), Negroamaro is considered by many to be the region’s top red grape. Traditionally blended with smaller amounts of Malvasia Nera to make the Cantele Salice Salentino, its rich flavor and freshness also make it suitable for barrique-aging (as in the case of the Teresa Manara, made from 100 percent Negroamaro grapes).

    Gianni is very happy with this year’s harvest and expects the wines to be classic in style.

    No one really knows the origin of the grape name, although some believe it to mean bitter red [grape], possibly inspired by the fact that it is an excellent grape to use in the production of dry red wines.

    Others think that the name might be a hybrid compound of Latin and Greek meaning red-red [grape], perhaps because Latin and Greek were once spoke in Puglia, a former Greek colony that was ultimately conquered by the Romans.

  • The bees know when it’s time to harvest the Negroamaro

    “The bees,” wrote winemaker Gianni Cantele on his Facebook this morning, “tell you a lot more than any grape refractometer could! We’re ready to pick!”

    A grape refractometer is a handheld device that allows growers and winemakers to measure the brix (sugar levels) in the berries in the vineyard without having to take them to the lab for analysis.

    But who needs one when you have the bees???!!!

    Let the Negroamaro harvest begin!

  • Wine Spectator features Cantele Rosato

    With harvest well under way here in Salento at the Cantele winery, we couldn’t have been more thrilled to learn that Wine Spectator has featured our Rosato from Negroamaro as one of the editors’ top rosé wines for the summer of 2019.

    In “10 Rosés for One Last Hurrah,” senior editor Alison Napjus offers this tasting note for the 2018 Cantele Rosato (88 points), one of the magazine’s recommended wines for Labor Day weekend (the official end of summer in the U.S.):

    “A bright and buoyant rosé, with an appealing mix of mulberry and white cherry, almond blossom and pink grapefruit sorbet. Tangy finish.”

    Click here for the complete review (subscribers only).

  • Wine Folly — the number one wine blog in the world — recommends Cantele Salice Salentino

    It’s always nice when a wine writer recommends your wine.

    It’s even nicer when a top wine writer recommends your wine on the number one wine blog in the world!

    We couldn’t have been more thrilled to learn that veteran wine writer and New York Times contributor Stacy Slinkard included Cantele’s Salice Salentino in her post this week on “the Best Italian Red Wines for Beginners” on Wine Folly.

    Click here for her post and for the other Italian red wines and producers she recommends.

    Thank you, Stacy! And thank you, Wine Folly!

  • Negroamaro: origin of the grape name

    A post from our American wine blogger Jeremy Parzen, author of DoBianchi.com.

    The “numerous synonyms” of Negroamaro, write the editors of Jancis Robinson’s excellent Wine Grapes (New York, HarperCollins, 2012), “suggest that Negroamaro is an old and historically widespread variety. Its etymology and origin are disputed: some authors suggest a simple etymology from negro (‘black’) and amaro (‘bitter’), while others supposed a Greek etymology and origin from mavro (‘black’), despite the redundancy of ‘black black’, referring to the historical links between Puglia and Greece. Since Negroamaro’s DNA shows no relation to modern Greek varieties, the ‘black-bitter hypothesis’ seems more logical. In addition, a variety named Negro Dolce (‘black sweet’) is documented in Salento in the nineteenth century, probably to distinguish it from the better amaro one.”

    As a philologist, I might tweak their speculation that the “black-bitter hypothesis’ seems more logical.” After all, etymology is rarely logical however plausible. In other words, word origins seldom align as neatly as the human mind and heart would like.
    Continue reading Negroamaro: origin of the grape name

  • “Best value.” Wine Spectator on Cantele Salice Salentino…

    Here’s what Wine Spectator Italian editor Alison Napjus has to say about the Cantele Salice Salentino, a wine she has included in her “best value” round ups.

    Cantele Salice Salentino
    89 points
    BEST VALUE

    Juicy flavors of ripe wild strawberry and red licorice mark the start to this light-to medium-bodied red, with supple tannins lending some structure and weight. Savory accents of garrigue, loamy earth and star anise echo on the finish.

    The wine has also been included by Wine Spectator senior editor Tim Fish in his Memorial Day recommendations for summer grilling.

    Click here for his blog post.

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